Working safely

Bringing health and safety to life (IOSH)

Working safely – overview

This course follows the Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s certificated syllabus, covering all
the health and safety basics plus environmental issues. It is a one-day course for staff from any sector
with no supervisory or managerial responsibility. It provides a grounding in the essentials of health
and safety – everyone at work should have an understanding of why they must ‘work safely’ and this
course offers exactly that. Since ‘Working safely’ was first launched in 1993, over 200,000 people
from a huge range of sectors have successfully completed the course and learned how to ‘work
safely’.

Full details below or download course outline.

Learning objectives

‘Working safely’ is for people at any level, in any sector, needing a grounding in the essentials of
health and safety. Everyone at work should have an understanding of why they must ‘work safely’
– and this course offers exactly that. What will they get out of it? What they need to know – and are
perhaps reluctant to learn about – in a refreshingly informal way. ‘Working safely’ isn’t supposed
to turn participants into safety experts. It focuses on why health and safety is important, and how
individuals can make a real difference to the well-being of themselves and others through changing
their behaviour.

On successful completion of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define ‘working safely’
  • Identify hazards associated with their work activities
  • Assess (qualitatively) the risks associated with each hazard
  • Use appropriate workplace precautions for specific risks
  • Seek advice on workplace precautions
  • Assist managers in preparing written risk assessments

Benefits for the organisation

  • Nationally recognised and respected certificated training for your teams
  • Peace of mind offered by training that’s designed and quality-controlled by the chartered body for
    health and safety
  • Minimum disruption to working days and shifts – the one-day programme includes the
    assessment, so there’s no need to free up further time for a test after the course
  • ‘Working safely’ meets the government’s guidelines for introductory health and safety training and
    is a 100 per cent match to the Health and Safety Executive’s ‘passport’ syllabus
  • Two key areas – health and safety and environmental basics – are covered in a single self-
    contained session
Who should attend?

The course is intended for staff from any sector, regardless of whether they have supervisory or
managerial responsibility or not.
Course format

A one-day course involving formal presentations, videos and workshop exercises. The inter-active
nature of the programme requires that it be limited to no more than 16 participants.
Special feature – IOSH certification

Understanding of the course material is evaluated by means of a 15-minute written assessment paper
consisting of 10 multi-choice questions.

An IOSH Working Safely certificate is awarded to all those who attend the course and successfully
complete the test.

Expert trainer

Subash is a Past President and current (2015) vice-chair of the Board of Trustees of the Chartered Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH).

A Chartered Fellow of IOSH, Subash has a wealth of experience in risk management, having worked across a range of sectors and disciplines in a truly diverse 25-year career to date.

Having qualified originally as an Occupational Hygienist, Subash started his professional career in local government before moving on to the brewing industry, working for Grand Metropolitan and Courage Brewing as their regional SHE Manager. His next career move led him to Rentokil Initial, where he spent eight years, the last two as a board director within Initial Catering Services.

In 2002, Subash founded a successful risk management and loss control consultancy that provides services to blue chip companies, as well as to a large number of SMEs, around the world.

Subash is an experienced health and safety trainer and public speaker. He contributes regularly to a number of health and safety publications as well as writing the successful ‘common sense guide to…’ series of books published by Routledge. He has been involved in the production of several health and safety documents for trade associations and for the Health and Safety Executive.

Outside the world of work, Subash was a public member of Network Rail (2008-11), is a serving Magistrate and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA).

An experienced trainer, he has a unique ability to captivate his audiences, as the following comments show:

‘Fantastic trainer who totally engaged and motivated the group.’

‘Subash again performed with knowledge, information and humour.’

‘Very well presented. I think the subject was demonstrated in a manner that meant all attendees were able to absorb and understand all items covered.’

‘I actually quite enjoyed the course!!’

‘A good course, excellent content and very well paced.’

‘Subash was extremely knowledgeable – a H&S encyclopaedia.’

‘A lot more interesting and engaging than expected!’

‘The speaker clearly had a significant breadth and depth of understanding and experience of the subject.

‘Excellent use of case studies and ‘real life’ examples. A real professional.

Working safely – course outline

1 Introducing working safely

It’s not unusual for people coming on an introductory course to think that accidents only happen
to ‘other people’. This module stresses the realities of the human suffering behind the statistics
and emphasises the importance of personal responsibility.

2 Defining hazard and risk

This module puts ‘hazard’ and ‘risk’ into everyday language, and uses familiar examples to
show what can happen. Importantly, it makes it clear that even something that is very simple
or repeated over and over again can go wrong, with serious consequences. Focusing on the
six broad hazard groups, participants are asked to think about the hazards and risks they come
across in their own work. ‘Risk assessment’ is demystified – participants learn that we all carry out
informal assessments day in, day out.

Learning outcomes
Participants will be able to:

  • Define ‘working safely’
  • Identify hazards associated with their work activities
  • Assess (qualitatively) the risks associated with each hazard
  • Use appropriate workplace precautions for specific risks.
  • Seek advice on workplace precautions
  • Assist managers in preparing written risk assessments.

3 Identifying common hazards

All the main issues are covered in this module – entrances and exits, work traffic, fire, chemicals,
electricity, physical and verbal abuse, bullying, stress, noise and the working environment,
slips, trips and falls, and manual handling. Each area is backed by crystal clear examples and
recognisable scenarios, and useful summaries reinforce the key learning points.

This session is usually tailored for the organisation in order to focus on the hazards and risks
associated with the participants’ own specific work undertakings (tasks and activities).

Learning outcomes
Participants will be able to:

  • Identify the hazards and risks associated with the most commonly occurring sources of
    hazards
  • Identify the hazards and risks associated with their own specific work undertakings (tasks and
    activities)

4 Improving the organisation’s safety performance

This module deals with systems and processes, making sure that any jargon is explained in
easily understood terms. The session bridges the gap between management and workforce,
encouraging participants to play a part in processes that are commonly seen as just down to their
manager or supervisor. Other areas – including contract work, inspections, safe systems and
permits, protective equipment, signage, emergency procedures, reporting and health checks –
are all focused on from the participants’ point of view.

Learning outcomes
Participants will be able to:

  • Comment on their organisation’s Health and Safety Policy
  • Comply with requirements for control in safety management
  • Co-operate with managers in safety activities
  • Communicate on safety matters
  • Identify the competencies required to carry out their work activities without risk to themselves
    or others
  • Report relevant accidents and incidents in which they are involved, or of which they have
    knowledge
  • Monitor their own work activities and assist managers in their active monitoring activities

5 Protecting our environment

A short but effective introduction to waste and pollution leads into a look at how organisations and
individual team members can get involved in reducing environmental impacts. Memorable and
thought-provoking facts and figures help drive the points home.

This session is usually tailored for the organisation in order to focus on any environmental issues
associated with the participants’ own specific work undertakings (tasks and activities).

Learning outcomes
Participants will be able to:

  • Identify where they can reduce adverse environmental impacts